See science in motion at “Twitch, Pop, Bloom”

0
Curator Sonia Epstein stands in front of the ‘Twitch, Pop, Bloom’ gallery exhibit at the Museum of the Moving Image. Photo credit: Nate Dorr

logo that says It’s not uncommon for people to flock to a theater to see a big science blockbuster. But when was the last time you saw people asking for tickets to an educational film made by scientists? The answer is probably never.

But that was not unusual in the early 1900s, when motion pictures were a burgeoning medium and science captured the public imagination.

This summer, the Museum of the Moving Image (MOMI) in Queens, New York, is highlighting science education films from the past in the new exhibition “Twitch, Pop, Bloom: Science in Action”.

SciFri Producer Kathleen Davis talks to Sonia Epstein, Associate Curator of Science and Film at MOMI, about how these early videos and research went hand in hand during the dawn of cinema, and the importance history of some of the videos of the exhibition.

Three living tulips projected on a white wall
Excerpt from “The Birth of a Flower” (1910). Used with permission from the Museum of the Moving Image. Photo credit: Nate Dorr
Musicians Will Epstein, Shahzad Ismaily, Sarah Pedinotti accompany “Wild birds in their lairs » (1909). Used with permission from the Museum of the Moving Image. Photo credit: Nate Dorr

Mentioned in the show:


Donate to Science Friday

Invest in quality science journalism by donating to Science Friday.

Make a donation

Share.

Comments are closed.