Painted Ruminations – The New Indian Express

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Express press service

BENGALURU: They say that when artists collaborate, magic happens. In many art forms you can find such examples. A recent example is an exhibition at the Hebbar Art Gallery, celebrating the works of artists Sameer and Raja. While they had worked individually to complete their paintings, the two artists came together to represent their works under the name ‘Prarabdha Art Exhibition‘.

“When Mr. Murali Gatti, owner of the gallery, put Raja and me in touch, we decided to host this exhibition. A collaborative effort was rare for me as most of my art was personal explorations, but we both got off to a good start from the start,” says Sameer, who has painted since childhood but turned professional as a full-artist. time just a few years ago. Unlike Sameer, Raja has been a professional in the art scene since 2011.

After completing his graduate studies in art at Shantiniketan in West Bengal, he mainly worked as an art teacher at a school in Tumkur. Although both have been practicing the art for many years, this is their first exhibition. Hence the name ‘Prarabdha’, a rooted word in Sanskrit meaning ‘begun’. Although this showcase is a joint effort, the art for Sameer and Raja has separate meanings.

« I started with landscapes and the representation of nature, but now my art has evolved into explorations of my being. It was almost as if I was going to paint to discover and resolve my complexes and any stresses I might have gone through. I have also created art to communicate my feelings about many global causes, like pollution, for example,” says Sameer, who adds that his art also ventures into the divine and the whole process is very spiritual for him.

While Sameer touches on the divine aspect of life in his art, Raja lives there. His work is heavily influenced by mythological stories and he does this in a rather unique way. “I do reverse painting. It’s a bit like painting on glass, but I do it on an acrylic sheet. It’s a transparent sheet, and I’m working on the back of it. But what you see is the other side. So it’s always a challenge for me. But it also helps me to experiment more.

Regarding my inspirations, I base my work on mythology and the divine”, explains Raja, adding that sometimes he also bases his art on slices of his life. Sameer believes that art can be a healing process. Some paintings also helped him through a depressive phase in his life.

For him, painting is a process that takes place in solitude, and some of his works are more valuable to him because of the emotional weight they represent. For this reason, exhibiting his works of art to the public has been an interesting experience for him. “We’ve all heard of how subjective art can be, but this was the first time I really experienced it.

I observed the visitors and sometimes they were transfixed by one of my paintings in particular which I did not appreciate very much, in the emotional sense”, he laughs. Even though these two artists have presented some of their most precious works to the public in this exhibition, is there a work that is so deeply personal to them that will never be released to the general public?

“It could be. It may be true in some cases that you choose not to reveal a particular work that is very in touch with your emotions, but I think whatever you do you can share it with others,” concludes Raja.

BENGALURU: They say that when artists collaborate, magic happens. In many art forms you can find such examples. A recent example is an exhibition at the Hebbar Art Gallery, celebrating the works of artists Sameer and Raja. While they had worked individually to complete their paintings, the two artists came together to represent their works under the name ‘Prarabdha Art Exhibition‘. “When Mr. Murali Gatti, owner of the gallery, put Raja and me in touch, we decided to host this exhibition. A collaborative effort was rare for me as most of my art was personal explorations, but we both got off to a good start from the start,” says Sameer, who has painted since childhood but turned professional as a full-artist. time just a few years ago. Unlike Sameer, Raja has been a professional in the art scene since 2011. After completing his higher education in art at Shantiniketan in West Bengal, he mainly worked as an art teacher at a school in Tumkur. Although both have been practicing the art for many years, this is their first exhibition. Hence the name ‘Prarabdha’, a rooted word in Sanskrit meaning ‘begun’. Although this showcase is a joint effort, the art for Sameer and Raja has separate meanings. « I started with landscapes and the representation of nature, but now my art has evolved into explorations of my being. It was almost as if I was going to paint to discover and resolve my complexes and any stresses I might have gone through. I have also created art to communicate my feelings about many global causes, like pollution, for example,” says Sameer, who adds that his art also ventures into the divine and the whole process is very spiritual for him. While Sameer touches on the divine aspect of life in his art, Raja lives there. His work is heavily influenced by mythological stories and he does this in a rather unique way. “I do reverse painting. It’s a bit like painting on glass, but I do it on an acrylic sheet. It’s a transparent sheet, and I’m working on the back of it. But what you see is the other side. So it’s always a challenge for me. But it also helps me to experiment more. Regarding my inspirations, I base my work on mythology and the divine”, explains Raja, adding that sometimes he also bases his art on slices of his life. Sameer believes that art can be a healing process. Some paintings also helped him through a depressive phase in his life. For him, painting is a process that takes place in solitude, and some of his works are more valuable to him because of the emotional weight they represent. For this reason, exhibiting his works of art to the public has been an interesting experience for him. “We’ve all heard of how subjective art can be, but this was the first time I really experienced it. I observed visitors and sometimes they were transfixed by one of my paintings in particular that I didn’t appreciate very much, in an emotional sense,” he laughs. Even though these two artists presented some of their most precious works to the public in this exhibition, is there one work that is so special to them? deeply personal that will never be released to the general public?” It could be. It may be true in some cases that you choose not to reveal a particular work that is very much in touch with your emotions, but I think whatever you do you can share it with others,” concludes Raja.

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